Ortho Evra Lawsuits

Ortho Evra is a birth control patch designed for external application to the skin once a week to prevent pregnancy. Manufactured by Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Ortho-McNeil, Ortho Evra has been available to consumers since 2002 and has been marketed as an easy and safe alternative to the birth control pill.

However, the patch, which different from the pill allows estrogen to enter the bloodstream more steadily, may create increased exposure to the hormone. Over the years, Ortho Evra users have reported some hazardous side effects from patch use, including heart attacks, blood clots and strokes. A number of deaths have also been directly linked to this contraception patch.

After an investigation, the FDA in 2005 required Ortho-McNeil to begin warning patients and physicians of these potential life-threatening risks through the Ortho Evra label. While the new label was a step in the right direction, it did little to help those women already affected by the drug’s grave side effects.

Today Ortho Evra lawsuits point to the fact that Johnson & Johnson knew that the patch’s design could release significantly higher levels of estrogen compared to other forms of birth control, yet failed to warn consumers of this potentially lethal risk.

Thousands of state and federal cases have been filed against this pharmaceutical giant, and settlements have been reached with former Ortho Evra users. If you have used the Ortho Evra patch and believe a major side effect such as blood clotting, heart attack or stroke may be related to over-exposure to estrogen, you’re not alone. Contact our defective drug attorneys to learn more about ongoing Ortho Evra litigation and how you can begin to help hold our drug companies liable for negligence.